Fathers for Life
Fatherlessness, the lack of natural fathers in children's lives
| Home | In The News | Our Blog | Contact Us | Share


Fathers for Life Site-Search


 
Site Map (very large file)
Table of Contents
Activism
Children—Our most valued assets?
Educating Our Children for the Global Gynarchia
Child Support
Civil Rights & Social Issues
Families
Family Law
Destruction of Families
Fatherhood
Fatherlessness
Divorce Issues
Domestic Violence
Feminism
Gay Issues
Hate, Hoaxes and Propaganda
Health
Help Lines for Men
History
Humour
Law, Justice and The Judiciary
Mail to F4L
Men's Issues
Suicide
The Politics of "Sex"
Our Most Popular Pages
Email List
Links
References - Bibliography

You are visitor

since June 19, 2001

 
 
 
 

Canadian Child-Custody Information


The information in this document and the associated pages were copied from the Canadian Custody Home Page published by Paul Millar, at http://www.cadvision.com/Home_Pages/accounts/pmillar/custody.htm.
The website at that address is no longer in operation, but some of Paul Millar's child custody and child-support research information is now accessible at the website of the Canadian Family Research Institute (CFRI) and here at this page (with permission).

© Paul Millar.
73 Holland St. NW
Calgary, AB T2K 2E7
(403) 247-0430
pmillar1@telus.net

  1. Court-Ordered Child Custody Awards (Graphs for Canada, Provinces & Territories)
  2. What Were They Thinking?
    The Development of Child Support Guidelines in Canada (PDF file, 97kB)
  3. Private Troubles, Private Solutions - A summary of an article written by Jane Pulkingham
  4. How Many Custody Claims are Contested?
  5. Sources for Custody Statistics in Canada
  6. Research and Studies on Child Custody

Court-Ordered Child Custody Awards (Canada, Provinces Territories)

Select from the list below:

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]


Top

Canada - Newfoundland - Prince Edward Island - Nova Scotia - New Brunswick
Québec - Ontario - Manitoba - Saskatchewan - Alberta - British Columbia
Northwest Territories - Yukon [Sources]



Contested Custody Claims in Canada

According to a report by the Canadian Department of Justice (1) less than 4% of divorces are finalized by a contested hearing in Canada. In contested cases (where there is a counter-petition or trial), 75% result in sole maternal custody and only 8% in sole paternal custody.

The above information is from an article by Jane Pulkingham in the Canadian Journal of Law and Society, Vol 9, #2, Fall 1994, p.73-97.

(1) Department of Justice, Evaluation of the Divorce Act, Phase II: Monitoring and Evaluation (Canada: Bureau of Review, 1990)

Top of Document



Custody and Divorce Data in Canada


Top of Article Top of Document


© Paul Millar.

73 Holland St. NW
Calgary, AB T2K 2E7
(403) 247-0430
pmillar1@telus.net


Sources for Custody Statistics in Canada

Information regarding custody determinations by Courts of Law in Canada is available from Statistics Canada, and from the Central Divorce Registry of the Department of Justice, Canada.

How is this Data Collected?

The data on divorces is collected by the Central Divorce Registry of the Department of Justice, Canada., from the courts in each province and territory. The Central Divorce Registry releases the data to Statistics Canada for processing into reports. Statistics Canada breaks down the data by Divorce Law (either 1968 or 1985), who was the Applicant/Petitioner and Respondent, and how many children were awarded to which party. These graphs summarize the number of children given by the court in custody to the wife, husband or joint custody regardless of who initiated the divorce or which law the divorce was granted under. Since 1986, the majority of divorces were granted under the Divorce Act of 1985.

What Data is Included?

The number of dependant children in divorces involving custody orders includes only those children from divorces in which the divorce court make a custody decision (i.e. where a court order was issued by a judge). These figures include custody determinations in so-called "Consent" Orders. A "Consent" Order is an order where the two parties (or at least their lawyers) negotiate a custody determination which is then ratified by a judge without a formal trial. It is worthy of note that the results of negotiations involved in "Consent" Orders are generally governed by the expected outcome in a Court of Law. That is, the parties may not, in fact, be satisfied, but consent because they expect they will do no better in a Court of Law.

What Data is Not Included?

Data on children for whom a custody decision was made that was not pursuant to a court order are not included.

What Year is a Custody Order Recorded Under?

Custody determinations are recorded in the year of the Decree Absolute of the divorce. That is, the year in which the divorce is finalized, not necessarily the year in which it began, nor the year it was tried in court.

Where Can I Find More Data on Divorces and Custody?

Statistics Canada
Divorce Data

Years

Report

1921-1970 84-202
1972-1985 84-205
1986
1987-1988 82-003 S.17
1987-1993 84-213

© Paul Millar.
73 Holland St. NW
Calgary, AB T2K 2E7
(403) 247-0430
pmillar1@telus.net

_______________
Updates:
2007 12 22 (reformated)